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5 cyber security trends you can expect to see in 2019

2018 was the year of GDPR and we all became hyper-aware of our data management and cybersecurity, that said it didn’t stop us seeing major breaches on an industrial scale. Huge brands such as Marriott Hotel Group fell victims to major data breaches affecting millions .. Continue

Kaspersky cyber security trends 2019

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Industry Trends & Insights

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Written by
Steven Gifford

2018 was the year of GDPR and we all became hyper-aware of our data management and cybersecurity, that said it didn’t stop us seeing major breaches on an industrial scale. Huge brands such as Marriott Hotel Group fell victims to major data breaches affecting millions of customers and we saw WannaCry strike again when Boeing fell victim to the ransomware virus.

Because of these high profile incidents through, your customers are going to have cybersecurity at the forefront of their minds and you need to be prepared to have those conversions as soon as possible.

 

Strengthening cybersecurity regulations

GDPR was only the beginning of a long process of modernising British and EU law to allow for the fast-paced nature of cybercrime. As more and more high-profile incidents come to light, the scrutiny from our lawmakers is only going to become more aggressive. This strengthening of regulations will also be likely to affect cybersecurity vendors too, with a greater push for transparency. Some companies (Like Kaspersky Labs) are already leading the way in this by launching their “Transparency Centre”.

 

The skills deficit will grow meaning more companies will turn to MSPs for support

Globally we don’t have enough cybersecurity specialists in the workplace as legacy on-prem solutions are being replaced by a collection of cloud services working in tandem, this is a challenge for every business but particularly SMBs will need to rely on MSPs to provide expertise in lieu of in-house specialists.

 

New job titles will appear

Following the TalkTalk data breach, MPs in the house of commons recommended appointing a company office specifically responsible for securing a company’s systems, it is quite likely 2019 will see a number of companies appointing a “Chief Cybercrime Officer”. Is this a job you would want though? Given the inevitable nature of cyber attacks, would you want to be the one to bear all responsibility?

 

Forget stealing data, attackers are going after your integrity

Whilst the damage is by no means insignificant a simple theft of data is relatively straightforward and the pain is felt more in the short-term; would be attackers are going to instead be seeking to damage the integrity of your data which will cause long-term, reputational damage by leading to the questioning of the integrity of the data.

 

Securing the Internet of Things

IoT is opening up a new world but it is also presenting unique challenges. With a traditional network of servers and stations, cybersecurity solutions can keep them secure. When it comes to the Internet of Things, however, this changes. The industry as a whole lacks standardisation meaning developers often leave vulnerabilities in their design. Combine that with user-error and IoT devices are going to become the new gateway to your network for an attacker.

 

As we close of 2018 it is important to remember that many businesses do not have the capability or the time to prioritise cybersecurity as they should. Cloud Service Providers can step in and ensure that end-users are up to scratch but it is vital that these conversations are proactive. As a CSP you need to be aware of what the threats are and what the solutions are that you should be looking to provide.